Secret Mail shortcuts: Ten gestures to speed up your iPhone email!

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Secret Mail shortcuts: Ten gestures to speed up your iPhone email!

// TiPb – The #1 iPhone, iPad, and iPod touch blog

Apple’s Mail app for iPhone and iPad has a ton of features you can invoke at the tap of a virtual button. It’s what makes it simple and accessible even to first time iOS users. If you play around with it for a while, however, you’ll discover a bunch of gesture shortcuts as well. Once you get used to them, they can really speed up and expand your workflow.

Pull to search

Just like on the Home screen where you can touch and pull down to access Spotlight search, you can touch and pull down from any mailbox to bring up search for mail. Start typing and Mail will show you any messages that match.

Pull to refresh

Pull-to-refresh, originally created by Loren Brichter for Tweetie, is now ubiquitous in iOS. Any time you want to check for new messages, just touch the mailbox screen and pull down — further than you would for search — until you see the refresh spinner.

Swipe to go back

Another system-wide gesture, any time you’re in a message or mailbox, you can swipe to go back to the mailbox the message is in, or the account the mailbox in in. It’s especially handy for those with bigger phones.

Mark as unread

To quickly mark a message as read, touch it and swipe from left to right. To mark it as unread again, just repeat the gesture. You can swipe just far enough to see the big blue button, but if you keep swiping all the way across, you can skip the tap and really speed things up!

Flag and trash

To quickly trash or flag a message, touch it and swipe from right to left. You can tap the big orange flag button to flag it, or the big red trash button to delete it. You can also just swipe all the way across to save yourself a tap and send it straight to the trash.

More options

When you touch and swipe a message from right to left, in addition to flag and trash, you can also tap the big gray more button for additional options, including: reply all, forward, flag, mark as unread/read, move to junk, move message, and notify me…

Swipe Settings

If you don’t like the default behavior of the mark, flag, and trash swipe gestures, you can change them via Settings > Mail > Swipe Options. For example, if you prefer “archive” to “trash” simply choose that instead.

Hide the keyboard

Sometimes, where you’re responding to a message, you want to see more of it. Maybe you forgot the exact question you’re trying to answer, or you want to refer to something specific. No matter the reason, all you have to do is touch the message above the keyboard and swipe down to hide it.

Stack drafts

When composing a mail message, touch the title bar — where it says New Message — and swipe it down to temporarily store it as a draft while doing or checking something else. You can keep multiple draft cards open at a time, and tap them to get a rolodex interface just like tabs in Safari.

Jump to drafts

You can tap the compose button any time to start a new mail message, but if you tap-and-hold on it, you’ll be shown a list of your recent drafts so you can pick up right from where you left off.

Move an address

If you have a contact in the To: field but you want to move it to CC: or BCC:, you don’t have to delete and re-add it. Instead, just touch it and drag it right to where you want it.

More secrets

If you just can’t get enough of this stuff, and want to learn more of the secrets to iPhone mastery, check out our ultimate guides and secrets and tips pages. And if we missed any of your favorite Mail tips, add them to the comments below!

Best Mail apps for iPhone Secret Siri commands Secret Safari shortcuts






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How to control which apps have access to iCloud Drive

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How to control which apps have access to iCloud Drive

// TiPb – The #1 iPhone, iPad, and iPod touch blog

With iCloud Drive, you can create files in one app on your iPhone and then open or edit them in a different app on your iPad or Mac. For privacy and security reasons, however, you can also control which apps can access your iCloud Drive files.

How to revoke iOS app access to iCloud Drive Launch the Settings app on your iPhone or iPad. Tap on iCloud. Tap on iCloud Drive. Scroll down the list and turn Off any app you want to prevent accessing iCloud Drive.

Turn Off access to any apps you don’t want to use iCloud Drive with.

How to revoke Mac app access to iCloud Drive Click on the  menu in the top left corner of your Mac. Click on System Preferences. Click on iCloud. Click on Options… next to iCloud Drive. Uncheck the apps you don’t want to have access to iCloud Drive. Click Done and close out of Settings.






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Sonos Hacking – Hidden Sonos Http Pages

Awhile back I posted how to get the Sonos Controller up and running in Ubuntu. (It actually installs rather nicely on wine). However I wiped my Ubuntu install on my netbook and switched to a nightly build of Chromium OS, so I lost my Sonos controller from my netbook. This has prompted me to see if I can some how roll my own Sonos Controller on Chromium OS. From the research I’ve done so far (pretty limited) it seems that Sonos uses UPnP for its interaction and music control. I was hoping for a more REST style HTTP type API, but not so much. I have found several hidden HTTP pages that seem to be served on port 1400 though that seem interesting. I’ll post more once I delve into the dragons of UPnP and Sonos.

  • http://192.168.1.XXX:1400/reboot – Reboots the Sonos
  • http://192.168.1.XXX:1400/advconfg.htm – Not quite sure what this is doing, it has an enable/disable list box and the ability to submit the selection.
  • http://192.168.1.XXX:1400/support/review – Lists a brief summary of the connected devices on your Sonos network.
  • http://192.168.1.XXX:1400/status – Has several links that provide status information regarding the Sonos. There are ~30ish links on this page. Some of the more interesting ones are “dmesg”, “mount”, and “upnp”
  • http://192.168.1.XXX:1400/unlock.htm – Not sure what this one does, but seems like it could be potentially interesting. All that the page provides is a text box and a “submit” button.

Blog: Ransomeware: ufrivillig kryptering med mulige økonomiske konsekvenser. Beskyt dig selv, dine brugere og dit netværk.

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Blog: Ransomeware: ufrivillig kryptering med mulige økonomiske konsekvenser. Beskyt dig selv, dine brugere og dit netværk.

// Version2 – it for professionelle

Jeg får en del spørgsmål relateret til ransomware disse dage; fra virksomheder, venner, familie og (kon)kollegaer. I dag var det et par kommuner, i morgen er det måske dig selv eller dit netværk.
Hvad gør man når man er blevet ramt af ransomware? Hvad kan man gøre for at forhindre katastrofale k…


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How to transfer your data from your old PC to your new Mac

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How to transfer your data from your old PC to your new Mac

// TiPb – The #1 iPhone, iPad, and iPod touch blog

If you’ve just bought your first Mac and you’re switching from a Windows PC, congratulations! Welcome to the fold. You’re anxious to use your Mac, but you’ve amassed years of data on that PC. Switching platforms doesn’t mean starting over: You can still use those old files. Apple makes it easy with a free utility called Migration Assistant. Here’s how it works.

Migration Assistant is a utility Apple includes in the Utilities folder of every Mac. You’ll see it when you first start up your Mac, when your Mac asks you if you want to transfer data over from another Mac, a Time Machine backup, or a PC. Apple makes the app freely available for download for Windows from the Apple web site.

Migration Assistant will help you transfer files from a PC running Windows XP, Windows Vista, Windows 7, or Windows 8 operating systems. The Mac and the PC both have to be running Migration Assistant.

Both should be on the same network, in order to find each other. The data migration may take several hours depending on what’s being transferred and what means are used: Wi-Fi is slower, a wired Ethernet connection is faster. But one way or the other, your patience will be rewarded.

What actual data gets transferred will depend on which version of Windows you’re using, and what apps created your data. Bookmarks from Internet Explorer and Firefox will be brought into Safari, for example. iTunes content and image files should make it over as well. System settings will get pulled over. You’ll be able to specify what other files you’d like to bring over, too.

Email, contacts and calendar information are where it gets a bit tricky. The bottom line is that Migration Assistant will pull over your email account information, and if you’re using Microsoft Outlook, it should pull over your email messages, your contacts, and your calendars. Other apps may vary. Apple has posted a detailed chart of what gets migrated over to help you understand.

When you launch Migration Assistant on the Mac, you’ll be asked if you’re transferring data to or from that Mac. Click From a Windows PC and then press the Continue button.

Launching Migration Assistant on the PC is a one-way trip: It’s only designed to transfer data from your PC to a new Mac. After launching it, Migration Assistant for Windows will try to connect to its Mac counterpart; the two will handshake by asking you to verify a six-digit code that should be the same on each computer. Then the transfer can begin.

Migration Assistant on the Mac will then prompt you to specify what data files you’d like to move over to the Mac; you can select any of the files you’d like to see move over, and click Continue. The apps will then transfer data between machines.

Obviously there are other ways to move files between Macs and PCs. Thumbdrives will work on both machines, so you can manually transfer whatever files you want to use, for example. But Migration Assistant provides an elegant, convenient and absolutely free way of managing the transition to becoming a Mac user, as long as you have the time to use it.

Have any questions? Let me know.






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