How to use Mail Drop with OS X Yosemite

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How to use Mail Drop with OS X Yosemite

// TiPb – The #1 iPhone, iPad, and iPod touch blog

Sending files by e-mail attachments can be a big old P.I.T.A. thanks to restrictions imposed by service providers, corporate I.T. policies and a host of other things that can get in the way. Apple’s fixed that in OS X Yosemite thanks to a new feature called Mail Drop!

How to use Mail Drop to send large files in the OS X Yosemite Mail app Click on the  menu and choose System Preferences. Click on iCloud. Sign in to your iCloud account if you aren’t already.

That’s all there is to it! There’s nothing to configure or set up in order to use Mail Drop. As long as you’re signed in to your iCloud account in Yosemite, OS X will handle the rest!

Mail Drop simply acts as an intermediary, temporarily hosting your file attachments so you don’t actually have to push them through the e-mail server. That way nothing is going to get in the way of sending that big file you need to, whether it’s pictures of you and the family on vacation or an updated presentation that your boss needs for his Shanghai business trip.

Many mail servers impose strict limits on the size of a file you can attach to an e-mail — it’s usually measured in megabytes, and usually not that many megabytes at that. If your file enclosure is larger — if you’re sending big media files, for example — you’re stuck relegating yourself (and the recipient) to another file sharing method, like Dropbox, OneDrive or a host of other systems that will require both you to maintain an account.

Mail Drop, on the other hand, works with files up to 5 GB in size. The files are uploaded to iCloud, instead. What’s more, it’s seamless, especially on the Macintosh. If you’re sending the file to a Mac user, they’re going to see it attached just like they would with any other file.

People who aren’t using the Mac won’t have a hard time, though – they simply see the file attachment as a file marker in their mail message. When they click on the attachment, iCloud begins to download the file onto their computer.

I’ve mentioned iCloud, and you may be wondering if the file attachment counts against your total file allotment in iCloud, and I’m glad to say that it does not. So attach away! 5 GB is your new file size limit, thanks to Mail Drop!

Have any questions? Let me know in the comments.



Guide: Sådan laver du Boot-disk til OS X Yosemite

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Guide: Sådan laver du Boot-disk til OS X Yosemite

// MacZonen.dk

Skal du have lavet en kopi af Apples nye OS X Yosemite på eks. en lille USB-disk er det ret enkelt hvis du følger denne guide til kopiering af OS X. Vi har tidligere testet  funktionen med det lille gratis program DiskmakerX, som netop er opdateret til at understøtte OS X Yosemite. Du kan også fortsat anvende DiskmakerX til at lave kopier af OS X Lion og Mavericks. DiskmakerX er nemt at bruge og laver lynhurtigt en boot-disk med OS X Yosemite, som du kan anvende på alle dine computere eller til at geninstallere OS X Yosemite på en Mac når du evt. skifter til ny harddisk. Start med at hente OS X Yosemite i Mac App Store. Selve installeren er sikkert blevet slettet efter du har installeret OS X Yosemite, men i Mac App Store kan du hente OS X 10.10 ned igen. Du finder Yosemite under Køb. Normalt hentes OS X Yosemite ned på din computer i mappen Programmer og her skulle den hurtigt kunne se installationsfilen. Herefter åbner du blot DiskmakerX, version 4.0b3 er opdateret til OS X Yosemite, der automatisk finder dit installationsprogram. Ellers kan du selv vælge hvor programmet ligger. Herefter laver du blot din boot-disk, […]


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