How to clear the DNS cache on your iPhone, iPad & Mac



https://www.idownloadblog.com/2019/01/07/clear-dns-cache-mac-iphone-ipad-safari-chrome-firefox-opera-howto/

Clear DNS cache Mac hero imagemedia.idownloadblog.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/08/Safari-for-Mac-teaser-255×153.jpg 255w, media.idownloadblog.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/08/Safari-for-Mac-teaser-768×462.jpg 768w, media.idownloadblog.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/08/Safari-for-Mac-teaser-745×448.jpg 745w” sizes=”(max-width: 2000px) 100vw, 2000px” style=”box-sizing: border-box; border: 0px; vertical-align: middle; display: block; margin: 20px auto; max-width: 100%;” apple-inline=”yes” id=”466A6082-E355-45BB-B35B-6F8F12BC905C” src=”https://o1sen.dk/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/Safari-for-Mac-teaser.jpeg”>

Is a stale DNS cache making your web browsing experience excruciatingly slow? If so, you may have thought about speeding things up by switching to an alternate domain name server on your device. In that case, you’ll need to clear the DNS cache on your device. There are several ways to go about flushing DNS caches in iOS and macOS, and this step-by-step tutorial covers them all! Here’s how to delete the DNS cache on your iPhone, iPad and Mac.

If you cannot connect to some websites, a web page won’t load at all or your network slows down randomly for no apparent reason, chances are your device’s DNS cache has become corrupted due to technical glitches, administrative accidents or other reasons.

Aside from other reasons, the DNS cache may become polluted when unauthorized domain names or IP addresses are inserted into it via a network attack or malware/virus.

But worry not, resetting the DNS cache should help resolve those problems.

What is a DNS cache?

DNS, or “Domain Name System,” has been the staple of the Internet’s functionality since 1985.

In short, DNS is a decentralized naming system for devices connected to the Internet or a private network (VPN). The system assigns domain names to each of the devices while translating human-readable domain names like iDownloadBlog.com to the numerical IP addresses that identify services and devices with the underlying network protocols.

TUTORIAL: How to clear website data on Apple Watch

A DNS cache, also known as a DNS resolver cache, is a temporary database, a phone book of sorts, which helps speed up DNS lookups by storing records of all the recent network requests. Rather than having to memorize numerical IP addresses for your favorite websites, your device can tap into a cached table of recent DNS lookups to know how to load a web resource.

In other words, a DNS cache is just a memory of recent DNS lookups that your computer can quickly refer to when it’s trying to figure out how to load a website. A DNS cache is maintained by the operating system but some browsers may keep their own DNS cache.

TUTORIAL: How to clear browsing cache in Safari, Firefox & Chrome

All caches can become corrupt over time, and that’s especially true with DNS ones. A corrupt DNS cache may lead to intermittent problems with loading websites. Ergo, clearing the DNS cache so it doesn’t hold invalid items is usually the best way to solve any such woes.

It is very important to stress that clearing the DNS cache won’t remove your browsing history, website data, saved passwords or any other temporary Internet files that get saved to your device to speed up web page load times.

When and why you should clear DNS caches

Here are a few common scenarios in which clear the DNS cache may help.

  • Prevent DNS hijacking: This practice subverts the resolution of DNS queries, which can be achieved via malware or by modifying the behavior of a trusted DNS server to the point it no longer complies with Internet standards. Flushing your DNS cache minimizes risk of DNS hijacking, which is a significant problem in China.
  • Resolve page-loading problems: Starting fresh is the best way of addressing situations when some websites won’t load or web pages load slowly.
  • Server entires have changed: If an entry on the web server is changed or a new entry is added, you might need to flush the DNS cache immediately to prevent interruptions. Keep in mind that if you’re waiting for server-side DNS changes to propagate, adjusting your device’s DNS settings may not have a desired effect before the changes have carried over between servers around the world.
  • Using Google DNS or Open DNS servers: Before setting your device to use Google DNS or Open DNS servers as its DNS, which speeds up web browsing when on Wi-Fi, you’re advised to flush out the DHCP assignments by clearing out DNS caches.
  • Enforce a network settings change: If you’ve made changes to your device’s network settings, like adding a custom DNS as part of your VPN service, clearing out the DNS cache will make these changes take effect immediately without any further action.
  • Protect from malware: A computer virus or malware may change your DNS settings in the background, or fool you into changing them manually, in order to redirect you to a page full of ads or a phishing page that mimics a legitimate website. Clearing out the DNS cache deletes all the entries, including invalid or rogue records.

Even if you’re not having any problems loading web pages whatsoever, clearing out a stale DNS cache won’t just make your web browsing experience hassle-free but will also clean up the valuable storage space in your device.

TUTORIAL: How to erase your browsing history in Safari

Your router has a DNS cache, too, meaning that any DNS troubleshooting steps should also include flushing the DNS cache on both the computer and the router.

Follow along with us as we explain how to clear the DNS cache on your iPhone, iPad and Mac.

How to clear DNS caches

You can flush the DNS cache in ways more than one.

How to clear DNS caches on iPhone and iPad

On iOS, you have three different ways of clearing the DNS cache. Firstly, you can toggle Airplane Mode on and then back off, which has the side-effect of flushing the DNS cache. Secondly, you can simply reboot your device in order to achieve the same effect like the Airplane Mode method. And thirdly, dumping your network settings will also do the trick.

Method #1: Airplane Mode

Toggling Airplane Mode is the quickest way to flush your DNS cache because doing so instantly turns off the wireless features on your device and shuts down cellular radios so that you comply with airline regulations. If you need to clear DNS caches multiple times per day, this is the method you’ll want to use (it works with cellular iPads, too).

1) Open Control Center by swiping down from the upper-right corner of the screen on iPhone X or later or iPad with iOS 12 or later. On older devices or iOS versions, swipe up from the bottom edge to pull up the Control Center overlay.

2) Tap the Airplane Mode icon in the top-left corner of the Network Settings card.

When Airplane Mode is toggled on, the icon turns orange to denote that all cellular services are currently shut down, which will also prompt iOS to flush the system’s DNS cache.

3) After about 15 seconds, tap the Airplane Mode icon again to re-enable wireless services.

Clear DNS cache iPhonemedia.idownloadblog.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/iOS_12_Control_Center_AirPlane_Mode-255×182.jpg 255w” sizes=”(max-width: 375px) 100vw, 375px” style=”box-sizing: border-box; border: 0px; vertical-align: middle; display: block; margin: 20px auto; max-width: 100%;” apple-inline=”yes” id=”A389D80B-AF76-4D98-B4E8-E590EDE4C193″ src=”https://o1sen.dk/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/iOS_12_Control_Center_AirPlane_Mode.jpeg”>

You can also go to Settings → Airplane Mode and tap the slider to turn it on.

Method #2: Rebooting

Restarting your device makes it fast and simple to flush the DNS cache.

1) Do the following:

  • On iPhone X and 2018 iPad Pro and newer: Press and hold the Side button and either volume button until the slider appears.
  • On older devices, like iPhone 8 and earlier: Hold down the Power button for a few seconds.

The Power button is also known as the Top button on iPod touch and iPad.

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iOS restart buttons have been rechristened and repositioned over the years

2) Swipe the slider labeled Slide to Power Off.

Clear DNS cache iPhonemedia.idownloadblog.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/iOS-12-Slide-to-Power-off-iPhone-X-255×165.jpg 255w” sizes=”(max-width: 375px) 100vw, 375px” style=”box-sizing: border-box; border: 0px; vertical-align: middle; display: block; margin: 20px auto; max-width: 100%;” apple-inline=”yes” id=”14FEFB41-5CA0-4239-9629-A128B91FD740″ src=”https://o1sen.dk/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/iOS-12-Slide-to-Power-off-iPhone-X.jpeg”>

3) After the device shuts down and turns off, wait a few seconds then press and hold the Side/Top/Power button again until you see the Apple logo. As a security precaution, when the device reboots you’ll need to enter your passcode to re-enable Touch ID or Face ID.

media.idownloadblog.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/iOS-12-Settings-GEneral-Shut-Down-001-255×124.png 255w” sizes=”(max-width: 375px) 100vw, 375px” style=”box-sizing: border-box; border: 0px; vertical-align: middle; display: block; margin: 20px auto; max-width: 100%;” apple-inline=”yes” id=”A2E791DF-13EF-4380-B693-2015E02189B4″ src=”https://o1sen.dk/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/iOS-12-Settings-GEneral-Shut-Down-001.png”>

If your device is on iOS 11+, you can also turn it off in Settings → General → Shut Down.

Because rebooting takes more time than toggling the Airplane Mode on and then back off, this isn’t the best approach if you need to flush your DNS cache multiple times per day.

NOTE: Concerned about DNS hijacking? If so, this isn’t the safest method of flushing the DNS cache because the hijacking may occur immediately after the device reboots, before you even have the chance to connect to a VPN.

Method #3: Network settings dump

Clearing the network settings on your device will also flush the system’s DNS cache.

1) Open Settings on your device.

2) Choose General from the list.

3) Tap Reset.

4) Choose Reset Network Settings.

Clear DNS cache iPhonemedia.idownloadblog.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/iOS_12_Reset_NEtwork_Settings_001-108×215.jpg 108w, media.idownloadblog.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/iOS_12_Reset_NEtwork_Settings_001-251×500.jpg 251w” sizes=”(max-width: 211px) 100vw, 211px” style=”box-sizing: border-box; border: 0px; vertical-align: middle; display: block; margin: 20px auto; max-width: 100%;” apple-inline=”yes” id=”003801CB-DCCC-4E90-9A27-280D03912B2D” src=”https://o1sen.dk/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/iOS_12_Reset_NEtwork_Settings_001.jpeg”>

5) Type in your passcode, if asked, then confirm that you wish to clear out all network settings and return them to factory defaults.

This may not be the best method because resetting your network settings won’t just restart the device (which clears the caches anyway) but also clear passwords for all the Wi-Fi networks you’ve joined. Worse, cellular data settings from your wireless provider will be cleared out, too, and all your other network settings will be lost so you’ll need to set them up again.

How to clear DNS caches on your Mac

On macOS, the flushing of DNS caches is performed through Terminal commands that have changed over the years, but don’t you worry a thing as iDownloadBlog has you covered.

1) First, open Terminal from your /Application/Utilities folder or via Spotlight.

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2) Type the command corresponding to your Mac operating system version, then press Enter.

  • macOS Sierra, High Sierra & Mojave (10.12, 10.13 and 10.14)

sudo killall -HUP mDNSResponder; sleep 2

  • OS X Yosemite 10.10.4+ and El Capitan (10.11)

sudo dscacheutil -flushcache; sudo killall -HUP mDNSResponder

  • OS X Yosemite (10.10.0-10.10.3)

sudo discoveryutil mdnsflushcache; sudo discoveryutil udnsflushcaches

  • OS X Mavericks (10.9)

dscacheutil -flushcache; sudo killall -HUP mDNSResponder

  • OS X Lion and Mountain Lion (10.7 and 10.8)

sudo killall -HUP mDNSResponder

  • OS X Leopard and Snow Leopard (10.5 and 10.6)

sudo dscacheutil -flushcache

If for some reason the Terminal command for macOS Sierra and newer won’t work properly, feel free to use the following syntax instead:

sudo killall -HUP mDNSResponder; sudo killall mDNSResponderHelper; sudo dscacheutil -flushcache

You will need to administrative privileges to execute these commands.

Bonus: Mac-cleaning software

If all of the above sounds too complicated, especially the Terminal method, consider a third-party solution such as MacPaw’s CleanMyMac, which is a much simpler alternative to clearing your DNS caches that works on all versions of the Mac operating system.

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Start by downloading CleanMyMac from the MacPaw website for free.

After you install the app, launch it and click on Maintenance in the lefthand sidebar menu. Now select the option Flush DNS Cache and click Run to have CleanMyMac do its magic.

Clearing DNS caches in Safari, Chrome, Opera & Firefox

In addition to the system’s own DNS cache, most browsers (barring Internet Explorer) also keeps a cached copy of the DNS records. This internal browser DNS cache may get corrupt over time and slow down lookups. Your browser automatically clears its cache when it’s restarted, but you can also do it manually without having to reopen the app.

Safari

1) Launch Safari on your Mac.

2) Enable Safari’s hidden Develop menu by choosing Preferences from the Safari menu.

Safari Preferences Menu Barmedia.idownloadblog.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/06/Safari-Preferences-Menu-Bar-397×400.png 397w, media.idownloadblog.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/06/Safari-Preferences-Menu-Bar-497×500.png 497w” sizes=”(max-width: 300px) 100vw, 300px” style=”box-sizing: border-box; border: 0px; vertical-align: middle; display: block; margin: 20px auto; max-width: 100%;” apple-inline=”yes” id=”5068589F-8CD7-451D-A318-EDC2EA9B209B” width=”240″ height=”242″ src=”https://o1sen.dk/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/Safari-Preferences-Menu-Bar.png”>

3) Click the Advanced tab.

4) Tick the box next to “Show Develop menu in menu bar”.

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Now the hidden Develop menu will appear in Safari’s menu bar.

5) Click the Develop menu, then choose the option Empty Caches.

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After clearing your browsing cache, be sure to quit and re-launch Safari for the best results.

Chrome

1) Launch Chrome on your Mac

2) Type chrome://net-internals/#dns in the address bar, then press Enter.

3) You’ll be taken to the DNS section of Chrome’s internal settings page. Click DNS in the left-hand column, then click the button labeled Clear Host Cache to flush the DNS cache.

4) Open a new tab, then type in the address chrome://net-internals/#sockets and press Enter.

5) You’ll be take to the section of Chrome’s internal settings page for cached socket pools. Click Sockets in the lefthand column, then click the button labeled Flush Socket Pools.

Now restart Chrome for the changes to take effect.

Opera

1) Launch Opera on your Mac

2) Type opera://net-internals/#dns in the address bar, then press Enter.

3) You’ll be taken to the DNS section of Opera’s internal settings page. Click the button labeled Clear Host Cache to flush the DNS cache.

4) Open a new tab, then type in the address opera://net-internals/#sockets and press Enter.

5) You’ll be take to the section of Opera’s internal settings page for cached socket pools. Now click the button labeled Flush Socket Pools.

Now restart Opera for the best results.

Firefox

1) Launch Firefox on your MAc.

2) In the address bar, type about:config and press Enter.

3) Click “I accept the risk!” on a warning page.

4) Use the search field at the top to search for “network.dnsCacheExpiration”.

5) Your search should return two variables, named “network.dnsCacheExpiration“ and “network.dnsCacheExpirationGracePeriod”. Double-click on each variable’s value part so you can edit it, then change the value from the default 60 to 0, which will prompt Firefox to immediately clear out its DNS cache.

6) After doing this, now set both variables back to 60.

Restart Firefox for the best resets.

Need help? Ask iDB!

Do you like this how-to?

If so, do pass it along to your support folks and leave a comment below.

Got stuck? Not sure how to do certain things on your Apple device? Let us know via help@iDownloadBlog.com and a future tutorial might provide a solution.

Submit your own how-to suggestions via tips@iDownloadBlog.com.

How to turn off Safari website notifications on macOS

 

How to turn off Safari website notifications on macOS

Safari website notifications are great to get up to date news as they are published. However, it can sometime be overwhelming and you might want to turn off Safari website notifications for certain sites.

Follow along to learn how to turn them off…

How to turn off Safari website notifications on macOS

    1. While in Safari on macOS, tap on Safari > Preferences.
    2. Tap on Websites and then Notifications on the left column.
    3. Highlight the website you’d like to turn off notifications for and tap the Remove button at the bottom. Confirm the removal.

Safari website notifications are great until you are overloaded with tons of them. Knowing how to manage them and reducing the amount of notifications pushed is always a good thing, especially when they start to get a bit spammy.

For more help getting the most out of your Apple devices, check out our how to guide as well as the following articles:


Check out 9to5Mac on YouTube for more Apple news:

How to Troubleshoot & Fix MacOS Mojave Wi-Fi Issues


How to Troubleshoot & Fix MacOS Mojave Wi-Fi Issues

Troubleshooting wi-fi problems in macOS Mojavecdn.osxdaily.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/11/macos-mojave-wifi-problems-fix-300×182.jpg 300w, cdn.osxdaily.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/11/macos-mojave-wifi-problems-fix-768×467.jpg 768w, cdn.osxdaily.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/11/macos-mojave-wifi-problems-fix-900×547.jpg 900w” sizes=”(max-width: 610px) 100vw, 610px” style=”max-width: 100%; margin: 0.5em auto; display: block;” apple-inline=”yes” id=”5BC01D8B-B994-4768-8541-535129C16561″ src=”https://o1sen.dk/wp-content/uploads/2018/11/macos-mojave-wifi-problems-fix-610×371.jpeg” class=””>

Have you been experiencing wi-fi problems since installing MacOS Mojave 10.14 on a Mac? While MacOS Mojave works great for most Mac users with compatible Macs (and even for many Macs that are unofficially able to run Mojave), a small number of MacOS Mojave users have discovered that wireless networking is having difficulties for them. Typically the Mojave wi-fi issues are that the connection has either failed, drops frequently, won’t reliably connect to wi-fi, is unable to connect at all, or even that general wi-fi performance is suffering, and the symptoms appear to have arrived only after updating a Mac to macOS Mojave.

This troubleshooting guide will aim to troubleshoot and resolve wi-fi problems and issues with MacOS Mojave.


Troubleshooting Wi-Fi Problems with MacOS Mojave

We’ll walk through a variety of steps to troubleshoot wireless networking issues on the Mac. Some of these are fairly simple, while others are more complex and require setting up new network profile information, moving system files, using custom network configurations, and other techniques that typically resolve wireless.

Important: Back up the Mac before going any further. This is essential because some of the troubleshooting steps involves accessing and removing system level configuration files. A full system backup is essential so that you can restore from if something goes haywire, and to prevent data loss. Backing up a Mac with Time Machine is easy, don’t skip it.

Install Available Software Updates, & Reboot the Mac

It’s always a good idea to keep system software up to date, and thus your first step should be to check for any available system software updates and install them if applicable.

You can check for and install system software updates in macOS by going to the Software Update control panel in “System Preferences”. Be sure to backup your Mac before installing any system software update.

If you do not have any system software updates available, go ahead and restart the Mac anyway, as sometimes a simple reboot remedies wi-fi and network issues.

Disconnect USB 3 / USB-C Devices, Docks, Hubs, etc from the Mac

If your wi-fi works but is frequently dropping, unable to connect, operates extremely slow, or is nearly useless, a possibility exists of hardware interference with certain USB 3 or USB-C devices and the Mac. This is because some USB devices emit radio frequency that can interfere with wireless networking.

Yes this sounds strange, but apparently some users are discovering that certain USB 3 and USB-C docks, hubs, and adapters are interfering with their wi-fi performance, typically on the newer model MacBook and MacBook Pro computers, but it can impact other machines as well.

An easy way to check if this applies to you and your wi-fi issues is to disconnect any connected USB 3 or USB-C devices, docks, hubs, or adapters from the Mac.

If the wi-fi connection works fine with the USB device disconnected, then you have likely found the culprit for your wireless network issues. If the USB cable is long enough, you can try moving the USB device further away from the computer itself so that nearby interference is minimized.

Some users report that changing the network connection from 2.4ghz to 5ghz can fix this issue, or getting a higher quality shielded USB hub may make a difference too.

For what it’s worth, this same USB interference issue can impact Bluetooth performance as well.

Make a New Wi-Fi Configuration in MacOS Mojave

These steps will walk through removing existing wi-fi configuration files to create new ones, which often resolves network problems on a Mac. Here’s what you’ll need to do:

  1. Back up your Mac first if you have not done so already – do not skip making a backup
  2. Pull down the Wi-Fi menu bar item in the upper right corner of the screen and choose “Turn Wi-Fi Off” to temporarily disable wi-fi on the Mac
  3. Now go to the Finder, and in any easily accessible location (Desktop, Documents, etc), make a new folder named something obvious like “WiFi Backup Files”
  4. Next, pull down the “Go” menu in the Finder and choose “Go To Folder”
  5. Enter the following path in Go To Folder then select “Go”
  6. /Library/Preferences/SystemConfiguration/

  7. Locate and select the following files in the SystemConfiguration folder
  8. NetworkInterfaces.plist
    com.apple.wifi.message-tracer.plist
    com.apple.airport.preferences.plist
    preferences.plist

  9. Select those files and move them to the “WiFi Backup Files” folder you made a moment ago
  10. Now pull down the  Apple menu and choose “Restart”, this will restart the Mac
  11. After the Mac boots back up, click on the Wi-Fi menu in the upper right corner again, this time selecting “Turn Wi-Fi On”
  12. Join the wireless network as usual by finding the wi-fi access point in the Wi-Fi menu

Now try using the internet again as usual, by opening Safari and visiting your favorite website (which is osxdaily.com obviously!). Wireless networking should work fine for most Mac users at this point.

If you continue to have problems with wireless networking and wi-fi, proceed to the next troubleshooting method.

Create a New Network Location with Custom Settings

Detailed below is how to create a new network location using custom configuration settings for DNS and MTU, this can often resolve finicky network issues on the Mac (and other hardware for that matter).

  1. Quit out of any open app that uses the internet (Safari, Mail, Messages, Chrome, Firefox, etc)
  2. From the  Apple menu, choose “System Preferences”
  3. Choose the “Network” panel, then choose “Wi-Fi”
  4. Pull down the “Location” menu and select “Edit Locations” from the dropdown menu
  5. Create a new location in Network preferences

  6. Click the [+] plus button to create a new network location, give it an obvious name like “FixWiFi” then click on “Done”
  7. a new network location to resolve some wireless networking problems

  8. Pull down the dropdown menu next to “Network Name” and choose the wi-fi network to join, then enter the wi-fi password if necessary
  9. Now click on the “Advanced” button, seen in the corner of the ‘Network’ preference panel
  10. Click the “TCP/ IP” tab and now click on “Renew DHCP Lease”
  11. renew DHCP lease to get DHCP info filled in automatically

  12. Now select the “DNS” tab, and within the “DNS Servers” area click on the [+] plus button to add the following IP addresses as one entry per line:
  13. 8.8.8.8
    8.8.4.4

    (Note these IPs are Google DNS servers, but you can use CloudFlare DNS or OpenDNS or others if desired)
    adding custom DNS settings to improve DNS lookups on Mac

  14. Now choose the “Hardware” tab and set ‘Configure’ to “Manually”
  15. Adjust “MTU” to “Custom” and set the number to “1491”
  16. Choosing custom MTU settings in network preferences

  17. Click “OK” to accept the MTU changes
  18. Click “Apply” to set the network changes for the new network location
  19. Exit out of System Preferences
  20. Finally, open Safari, Firefox, or Chrome, and try to visit a website like http://osxdaily.com where it should load fine

This series of steps involving trashing wi-fi preferences to create new ones and using a new Network Location with defined DNS and MTU settings are some of the most consistent means of resolving software based wi-fi issues on the Mac. We’ve covered similar troubleshooting steps for wi-fi problems with other versions of Mac OS, including for High Sierra, Sierra, El Capitan, and many releases before, because it almost always works.

Reset the Wi-Fi Router / Modem

If you’re having problems with a particular wi-fi router and/or modem, try resetting the router and modem. Usually this just involves unplugging the router and modem for about 20 seconds, then plugging them back in again.

The exact process of resetting routers and modems can vary per manufacturer, and thus it would be impossible to cover all of the options here. If you’re not sure how to troubleshoot wi-fi network issues that are directly related to the wi-fi router and modem (cable, DSL, fiber, dial-up, etc), then contact your ISP for their technical support guidance.

Additional Wi-Fi Troubleshooting Steps

For what it’s worth, almost every single MacOS system software update seems to cause a small number of Mac users some wi-fi grief, and in most cases it’s just a matter of a corrupted plist file, a DHCP or DNS issue, or something fairly simple to resolve. This is no different with the MacOS Mojave 10.14 update (and even the 10.14.x updates), and so while the vast majority of Mac users will experience no difficulty with wireless networking and the software updates, some issues can crop up for small numbers of Macs. The good news is that it’s usually a simple resolution.

Did the above troubleshooting steps resolve your wi-fi problems in MacOS Mojave? Did you find another solution to your wireless networking issues? Share with us your thoughts, experiences with troubleshooting, and solutions for fixing wifi difficulties, by leaving a comment below!

How to Remove an Apple ID from a Mac


How to Remove an Apple ID from a Mac

Removing an Apple ID and iCloud account from a Maccdn.osxdaily.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/10/sign-in-to-apple-id-icloud-account-mac-300×146.jpg 300w, cdn.osxdaily.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/10/sign-in-to-apple-id-icloud-account-mac.jpg 620w” sizes=”(max-width: 610px) 100vw, 610px” style=”max-width: 100%; margin: 0.5em auto; display: block;” apple-inline=”yes” id=”7C09942F-E9AA-4AAC-A4D5-1668702C4D01″ src=”https://o1sen.dk/wp-content/uploads/2018/11/sign-in-to-apple-id-icloud-account-mac-610×297.jpeg” class=””>

Have you unintentionally used an Apple ID or logged into an Apple ID on a Mac that isn’t yours, or perhaps that you don’t want iCloud access on? If so, you may wish to remove that Apple ID and iCloud account from that Mac. Similarly, you may want to delete an Apple ID from a Mac if you’re intending on changing the Apple ID in use on that computer for whatever reason.

This article will show you how to remove an Apple ID and iCloud account from a Mac.


Warning: Keep in mind that deleting an Apple ID and iCloud account from a Mac may result in unintended consequences, including loss of data, loss of Contacts syncing, loss of Notes syncing, an inability to use apps purchased or downloaded with a different Apple ID, an inability to access music purchased with a different Apple ID, and much more – if you log out of the Apple ID associated with all of that, then none of that data will be accessible on the Mac unless that Apple ID is used again. Thus you should not casually delete an Apple ID or iCloud account from a Mac.

How to Delete an Apple ID / iCloud Account from Mac OS

It’s a good idea to backup a Mac before modifying any important system settings like these, skipping a backup could result in unintended data loss.

  1. Go to the  Apple menu in the upper left corner then choose ‘System Preferences’
  2. Select “iCloud” from the preference panel options
  3. How to delete an iCloud account and Apple ID from Maccdn.osxdaily.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/10/howto-delete-icloud-account-from-mac-3-300×230.jpg 300w, cdn.osxdaily.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/10/howto-delete-icloud-account-from-mac-3-768×589.jpg 768w, cdn.osxdaily.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/10/howto-delete-icloud-account-from-mac-3-900×690.jpg 900w, cdn.osxdaily.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/10/howto-delete-icloud-account-from-mac-3.jpg 1560w” sizes=”(max-width: 610px) 100vw, 610px” style=”max-width: 100%; margin: 0.5em auto; display: block;” apple-inline=”yes” id=”4D506168-988B-48E0-8CFF-F0B6BDCCCDB7″ src=”https://o1sen.dk/wp-content/uploads/2018/11/howto-delete-icloud-account-from-mac-3-610×468.jpeg” class=””>

  4. Choose “Sign Out” from the iCloud preference panel
  5. Choose to Sign Out to remove the Apple ID and iCloud account from Maccdn.osxdaily.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/10/howto-delete-icloud-account-from-mac-2-300×217.jpg 300w, cdn.osxdaily.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/10/howto-delete-icloud-account-from-mac-2-768×556.jpg 768w, cdn.osxdaily.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/10/howto-delete-icloud-account-from-mac-2-900×652.jpg 900w, cdn.osxdaily.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/10/howto-delete-icloud-account-from-mac-2.jpg 1560w” sizes=”(max-width: 610px) 100vw, 610px” style=”max-width: 100%; margin: 0.5em auto; display: block;” apple-inline=”yes” id=”A43AD719-C1AE-4726-B0EA-6F87FCEA1928″ src=”https://o1sen.dk/wp-content/uploads/2018/11/howto-delete-icloud-account-from-mac-2-610×442.jpeg” class=””>

  6. Optionally but recommended for most users, select all possible options and choose to “Keep a Copy” of iCloud data on the local Mac *
  7. Choose to keep a copy of data when deleting iCloud and Apple ID account from Maccdn.osxdaily.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/10/howto-delete-icloud-account-from-mac-1-300×217.jpg 300w, cdn.osxdaily.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/10/howto-delete-icloud-account-from-mac-1-768×556.jpg 768w, cdn.osxdaily.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/10/howto-delete-icloud-account-from-mac-1-900×652.jpg 900w, cdn.osxdaily.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/10/howto-delete-icloud-account-from-mac-1.jpg 1560w” sizes=”(max-width: 610px) 100vw, 610px” style=”max-width: 100%; margin: 0.5em auto; display: block;” apple-inline=”yes” id=”4FD67085-3872-427C-A5EE-D7A81711E08C” src=”https://o1sen.dk/wp-content/uploads/2018/11/howto-delete-icloud-account-from-mac-1-610×442.jpeg” class=””>

* If you’re aiming to remove iCloud data as well as an Apple ID and iCloud account from a Mac, you may not want to choose “Keep a Copy” but that is ultimately up to you. Note that failure to do so may result in permanent data loss.

Once you are logged out of the Apple ID / iCloud account, the Mac will no longer have any of the iCloud features, files, or other Apple ID related data available to it (unless you then logged into a different Apple ID of course).

Removing the Mac Association from the Apple ID / iCloud Account

A follow-up additional step may be desirable for some Mac users if they are planning on never using the particular Mac again, or if they’re transferring it to a new owner with a different Apple ID, and that is to remove the device from the iCloud account, in this case you’ll be removing the Mac from the associated Apple ID / iCloud account. The simplest way to do this is from an iPhone or iPad using the same Apple ID:

This is a good step to take if you’re selling or transferring ownership of a Mac to someone else, as you wouldn’t want the older compute still showing up on your Apple ID and iCloud account if it’s no longer yours.

Keep in mind it’s unnecessary to manually delete an Apple ID from the Mac if you’re simply aiming to erase and reset a Mac to factory settings, perhaps to sell it, or give to someone else, because that reset process will also delete any Apple ID accounts from the computer. But you probably would want to remove the computer from the Apple ID account as instructed.

While the vast majority of Mac users should be using an Apple ID with their Mac, since an Apple ID functions as basically the login gateway to the entire online Apple ecosystem including iCloud, iTunes, and the App Store, some Mac users also may want to have a Mac that has no iCloud functionality or Apple ID related data either, perhaps because it’s a public workstation or some other community device. That would be another situation where deleting an Apple ID from a computer could be reasonable, but otherwise this is something you should not take lightly. It’s also worth pointing out that if you’re aiming to delete an Apple ID from a computer because it’s outdated or your email address changed, you would want to change the email address associated with the Apple ID and then use that for the login.

An Apple ID is really an important component of using a Mac or iOS device within the Apple ecosystem, giving full access to any of the iCloud environment, App Store, iTunes, iCloud files, photos, Contacts, Notes, and so much more. With that in mind, you will want your own unique Apple ID for your own personal use, as they are not intended to be shared (even with family, each family member, partner, spouse, etc, should have their own unique Apple ID). If you’ve been in the situation where you were previously sharing an Apple ID with a partner or child, then it would be reasonable to backup the computer/devices, create a new Apple ID for the other person(s), and then log out of the shared Apple ID and then back into a unique Apple ID for each person. Just don’t skip over the fact that removing an Apple ID from a Mac can potentially delete files, contacts, notes, and other data you may not intend to remove, so back that data up and keep a copy of it if you’re concerned.

Any questions, comments, experiences, or thoughts about removing or deleting an Apple ID from a Mac? Share in the comments below!

Tip: How to recover deleted files from iCloud on your Mac or iOS device


Tip: How to recover deleted files from iCloud on your Mac or iOS device

Many of our files are now hosted from inside of iCloud and you may not even know it. Not only does it this make them available on all your devices, but files can actually be recovered should they ever be deleted —at least most of the time.

Restore iCloud Files




Before you get your hopes up about recovering that long-gone term paper, there are as series of caveats that accompany iCloud file recovery. First, is understanding which files are actually housed in iCloud. Second is being within the recovery window. And third, is knowing from which devices recovery can be accessed cleanly —and how.






Starting with which files live inside iCloud, it can be a bit fuzzy. On recent versions of macOS, Apple syncs your Desktop and Documents folder to iCloud, making them available on the web and your iOS devices. Any files in those two locations can be synced to iCloud, assuming it is turned on.

Other files live there as well, such as those of popular apps such as Pages, Keynote, Numbers, Just Press Record, Affinity Photo, and many more. When files are saved in the default folders, any of these files could be potentially recoverable.

Our second qualifying factor is the timetable. Any files that were stored on iCloud get moved into iCloud’s trash, which keeps files for 30 days. If you delete a recording in Just Press Record, you’ve got about a month to recover it before it is lost forever.

Third, you have to be on a specific device to access to iCloud’s hidden trash depot — namely, a computer. Any iOS device — be it iPhone or iPad — is generally unable to access iCloud.com, which is where Apple keeps the list of deleted files. Therefore, you’be got to be on a Mac or PC to be able to find them. Some files can be restored using an iOS device and the Files app, but we will touch on that in a bit.

On the Mac



With that out of the way, let’s take a look.

  • First, head to iCloud.com and sign in

  • Next, click on the gear icon to access the iCloud Settings web app

  • Scroll to the bottom, and on the left you will see an option to Restore Files. Click that.



  • A window will appear, showing you all of your recently deleted files. Select the check boxes next to the files you’d like to restore, and tap Restore.




That is all you need to do!

There are additional nuances that may help along the way, such as sorting the files by date deleted, name, or size. It is also good to know that iCloud’s recovery feature is also painfully slow. Slowly but surely, your files will appear in their original locations.

iOS limitations



Whenever you head to iCloud.com you are presented with an explainer that outlines the abilities of iCloud but doesn’t give you the option to sign in. You can hold the refresh button in the navigation bar and tap Request Desktop Site, but it is certainly not a mobile-optimized experience, nor in our testing did it work for file recovery every time.



If you head to the Files app, there is an option for recently deleted files, but it does limit you to files that were deleted on your iOS device.

Ones ability to recover deleted files from iCloud is not going to be a full replacement for a real backup, which you absolutely should still have. (Note: check out AppleInsider’s guide on how and why you should be backing up your Mac)

If you’ve ever inadvertently moved a file from your desktop or documents folder to the trash and emptied it, then soon regretted it, you may not completely be out of luck. While slow, iCloud’s file recovery feature can easily be a lifesaver. 

Fix Terminal “Operation not permitted” Error in MacOS Mojave


Fix Terminal “Operation not permitted” Error in MacOS Mojave

Fix Operation Not Permitted Terminal Error in Mac OScdn.osxdaily.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/10/terminal-operation-not-permitted-error-mac-300×92.jpg 300w, cdn.osxdaily.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/10/terminal-operation-not-permitted-error-mac.jpg 620w” sizes=”(max-width: 610px) 100vw, 610px” style=”max-width: 100%; margin: 0.5em auto; display: block; height: auto;” class=””>

If you’re a Mac command line user you may have noticed that many frequently used commands entered into the Terminal (or iTerm) result in an “Operation not permitted” error message since updating to MacOS Mojave 10.14 or later. The “Operation not permitted” error in the Terminal can be seen after issuing even simple commands like using ‘ls’ ‘mv’ and ‘cp’ within the users own directory, but also in many other directory locations on the Mac, and when trying to use many defaults commands. Obviously this type of error message makes navigating and using the command line in MacOS Mojave to be quite difficult if not impossible for many purposes. Don’t worry, the Terminal is not broken in new MacOS versions.

This walkthrough will show you how to fix “Operation not permitted” error messages seen at the command line in Terminal for Mac OS in Mojave 10.14 or later.


How to Fix “Operation not permitted” Error in Terminal for Mac OS

  1. Pull down the  Apple menu and choose ‘System Preferences’
  2. Choose “Security & Privacy” control panel
  3. Now select the “Privacy” tab, then from the left-side menu select “Full Disk Access”
  4. Click the lock icon in the lower left corner of the preference panel and authenticate with an admin level login
  5. Now click the [+] plus button to add an application with full disk access
  6. Click the Plus button to add Terminal to Full Disk Access in macOScdn.osxdaily.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/10/fix-operation-not-permitted-error-mac-terminal-300×224.jpg 300w, cdn.osxdaily.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/10/fix-operation-not-permitted-error-mac-terminal-768×574.jpg 768w, cdn.osxdaily.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/10/fix-operation-not-permitted-error-mac-terminal-610×456.jpg 610w, cdn.osxdaily.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/10/fix-operation-not-permitted-error-mac-terminal-900×673.jpg 900w” sizes=”(max-width: 610px) 100vw, 610px” style=”max-width: 100%; margin: 0.5em auto; display: block;” apple-inline=”yes” id=”5F8EE250-8846-4796-B38B-70FFAF93F94E” src=”https://o1sen.dk/wp-content/uploads/2018/10/fix-operation-not-permitted-error-mac-terminal.jpeg” class=””>

  7. Navigate to the /Applications/Utilities/ folder and choose “Terminal” to grant Terminal with Full Disk Access privileges
  8. select Terminal app to grant full disk access in MacOScdn.osxdaily.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/10/fix-operation-not-permitted-terminal-mac-error-300×206.jpg 300w, cdn.osxdaily.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/10/fix-operation-not-permitted-terminal-mac-error-768×528.jpg 768w, cdn.osxdaily.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/10/fix-operation-not-permitted-terminal-mac-error-610×420.jpg 610w” sizes=”(max-width: 610px) 100vw, 610px” style=”max-width: 100%; margin: 0.5em auto; display: block;” apple-inline=”yes” id=”81CFB050-D69D-489C-82CF-23E0919CF228″ src=”https://o1sen.dk/wp-content/uploads/2018/10/fix-operation-not-permitted-terminal-mac-error.jpeg” class=””>

  9. Relaunch Terminal, the “Operation not permitted” error messages will be gone

If you have not encountered the “Operation not permitted” error message in the Terminal of MacOS (Mojave 10.14 or later) yet, then it’s likely because you haven’t wandered into a directory or file path that has the additional access restrictions (or that you don’t use Terminal, in which case this entire article is not for you).

While many of the various core System and root directories will throw error messages in macOS Terminal too, you can also find the error message even when trying to work in the users own Home directory, including in many of the user ~/Library/ folders, like ~/Library/Messages (where iMessage attachments and chat logs are stored in Mac OS) and ~/Library/Mail/ (where user-level mail plugins, mailbox data, and other Mail app data is stored), and many others.

You can test this yourself, before and after making the settings adjustment outlined above with a simple command like using ls on one of the protected folders:

ls ~/Library/Messages

If Terminal does not have Full Disk Access granted, you will see the “Operation not permitted” error message.

Operation Not Permitted error in Mac Terminalcdn.osxdaily.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/10/before-terminal-not-working-operation-not-permitted-mac-error-300×92.jpg 300w, cdn.osxdaily.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/10/before-terminal-not-working-operation-not-permitted-mac-error-768×235.jpg 768w, cdn.osxdaily.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/10/before-terminal-not-working-operation-not-permitted-mac-error-900×276.jpg 900w, cdn.osxdaily.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/10/before-terminal-not-working-operation-not-permitted-mac-error.jpg 1044w” sizes=”(max-width: 610px) 100vw, 610px” style=”max-width: 100%; margin: 0.5em auto; display: block; height: auto;” class=””>

If Terminal does have Full Disk Access granted, or if SIP is disabled, you will not see that error message in the MacOS Terminal.

Terminal working without error in macOScdn.osxdaily.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/10/terminal-working-again-macos-300×87.jpg 300w, cdn.osxdaily.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/10/terminal-working-again-macos-768×222.jpg 768w, cdn.osxdaily.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/10/terminal-working-again-macos-900×260.jpg 900w, cdn.osxdaily.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/10/terminal-working-again-macos.jpg 1054w” sizes=”(max-width: 610px) 100vw, 610px” style=”max-width: 100%; margin: 0.5em auto; display: block; height: auto;” class=””>

In case you were wondering, yes that does mean there are actually two ways to fix the “Operation not permitted” errors you may encounter in MacOS Terminal; the first which we detail here is rather simple that grants additional access privileges to Terminal app, and the other is a bit more dramatic which involves disabling System Integrity Protection on the Mac which is generally not recommended and we won’t specifically cover here, though simply disabling SIP and rebooting is typically enough to make the error go away if you’d rather go that route.

The “Operation not permitted” message is one of a variety of command line errors you may encounter in Mac OS Terminal. Another frequently seen command line error is the the “command not found” error message which can also be encountered in the Terminal for MacOS for a variety of different reasons as well.

If you have any other tips, tricks, suggestions, or thoughts about the command line in MacOS or this particular error message, share with us in the comments below.

How to Clean Install MacOS Mojave


How to Clean Install MacOS Mojave

How to Clean Install MacOS Mojave

How to clean install macOS Mojavecdn.osxdaily.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/10/howto-clean-install-macos-mojave-300×226.jpg 300w, cdn.osxdaily.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/10/howto-clean-install-macos-mojave-768×578.jpg 768w, cdn.osxdaily.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/10/howto-clean-install-macos-mojave-900×677.jpg 900w, cdn.osxdaily.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/10/howto-clean-install-macos-mojave.jpg 1400w” sizes=”(max-width: 610px) 100vw, 610px” style=”max-width: 100%; margin: 0.5em auto; display: block; height: auto;” class=””>

Performing a clean install of MacOS Mojave may be desirable to some Mac users. A clean install means erasing all data on a hard drive, and then installing a fresh new installation of MacOS Mojave to that Mac. The idea is that a clean install starts fresh, sort of like how a new Mac comes when you first open the box, with no customization, no third party apps, no user accounts, no user data, preferences, settings, caches, no personal files or data, it’s basically just a new clean installation of MacOS Mojave, and nothing else.

While the vast majority of Mac users should simply prepare for and update to macOS Mojave as usual from a prior MacOS system software release, thereby preserving their apps, customizations, personal files, and all else, this walkthrough is intended for users who want to erase a Mac completely and start over fresh to perform a clean install of macOS Mojave 10.14.


To perform a clean install of MacOS Mojave on a Mac, you’ll need the following:

Remember, a clean install will erase everything on the Mac, including all personal files, photos, movies, apps, any customizations or settings, or anything else. A clean install starts new, with absolutely no personalization or your data on the computer. Thus it becomes critical that you have separately backed up your personal data and anything important to you, as failure to do so will result in permanent data loss.

Warning: This process will erase everything on the Mac, and then perform a new clean install of macOS Mojave only. No personal files, data, or apps will be preserved or included on the Mac, unless you restore that data separately.

Do not proceed without sufficient backups of your important data and computer.

  1. Complete a full Time Machine backup before starting this process. It’s recommended to have a Time Machine backup, in addition to any manual file backup of your personal data that you wish to keep. Be certain you have backed up any important files, personal data, pictures, etc – do not skip a full backup
  2. Connect the bootable macOS Mojave installer drive to the Mac via a USB port
  3. Reboot the Mac, then immediately start holding the OPTION key on the keyboard
  4. Hold OPTION key until you see a boot selection menu appear on screen, then choose the “Install macOS Mojave” drive (this is the bootable USB installer) from the choices
  5. At the “macOS Utilities” screen, select “Disk Utility”
  6. In Disk Utility, choose “Macintosh HD” (or whatever your Mac hard drive is named that you want to format and clean install Mojave onto), then select the “Erase” button
  7. Erase the Mac to clean install macOS Mojavecdn.osxdaily.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/10/clean-install-erase-macintosh-hd-300×166.jpg 300w, cdn.osxdaily.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/10/clean-install-erase-macintosh-hd-768×425.jpg 768w, cdn.osxdaily.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/10/clean-install-erase-macintosh-hd-610×337.jpg 610w” sizes=”(max-width: 610px) 100vw, 610px” style=”max-width: 100%; margin: 0.5em auto; display: block;” apple-inline=”yes” id=”9720149A-18BB-431F-819B-62200EE1F6A6″ src=”https://o1sen.dk/wp-content/uploads/2018/10/clean-install-erase-macintosh-hd.jpeg” class=””>

  8. Choose “Macintosh HD” as the drive name, then go to “Format” and select “Mac OS Extended (Journaled)” or APFS depending on which file system format you use, then choose “Erase” – WARNING: ALL DATA ON THE MAC WILL BE PERMANENTLY ERASED
  9. Once the drive has finished erasing and formatting, quit out of Disk Utility
  10. Back at the ‘macOS Utilities’ screen, now select “Install macOS” from the available options
  11. Clean install macOS Mojavecdn.osxdaily.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/10/how-clean-install-macos-mojave-300×205.jpg 300w, cdn.osxdaily.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/10/how-clean-install-macos-mojave-768×524.jpg 768w, cdn.osxdaily.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/10/how-clean-install-macos-mojave-610×416.jpg 610w, cdn.osxdaily.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/10/how-clean-install-macos-mojave-900×614.jpg 900w” sizes=”(max-width: 610px) 100vw, 610px” style=”max-width: 100%; margin: 0.5em auto; display: block;” apple-inline=”yes” id=”09FC8B01-9518-4FE5-9FB1-9A7E6D4ABC3C” src=”https://o1sen.dk/wp-content/uploads/2018/10/how-clean-install-macos-mojave.jpeg” class=””>

  12. At the “Install macOS Mojave” splash screen, choose “Continue” and then select “Macintosh HD” as the destination to install macOS Mojave, and then choose “Install” to begin the clean macOS installation process
  13. MacOS Mojave will install fresh on the otherwise empty drive and computer, let this process complete, when finished macOS Mojave will boot up as if it were a brand new Mac

When the Mac has finished installing macOS Mojave, the computer boots up into a fresh clean install of macOS Mojave as if it’s a new computer, thus you’ll go through the standard setup process as if it were a new Mac. There are no personal files, no personal data, no apps, nothing on the Mac except for macOS Mojave and what comes with it by default. Thus, it’s a “clean install”.

A clean install of macOS Mojave showing a fresh desktopcdn.osxdaily.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/10/macos-mojave-desktop-300×226.jpg 300w, cdn.osxdaily.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/10/macos-mojave-desktop-768×578.jpg 768w, cdn.osxdaily.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/10/macos-mojave-desktop-900×677.jpg 900w” sizes=”(max-width: 610px) 100vw, 610px” style=”max-width: 100%; margin: 0.5em auto; display: block; height: auto;” class=””>

At this point, you’ll probably want to setup the Mac as new, and then go about manually re-downloading apps, utilities, and other stuff you use to the Mac, as well as manually restoring any of your important personal files and personal data to the computer. Or you can skip all of that and just use the Mac with a clean install of macOS Mojave as if it were a brand new computer, without restoring or copying any data back to it. That’s entirely up to you.

So that’s how you clean install macOS Mojave. If you have any questions, comments, or other methods for performing a fresh install of macOS Mojave, share with us in the comments below. 

How to install a fresh copy of macOS Mojave on your Mac


How to install a fresh copy of macOS Mojave on your Mac

You can reinstall a fresh copy of macOS Mojave with Recovery Mode!

macoOS Mojave

If something doesn’t quite work right after you’ve installed macOS Mojave, you can reinstall the operating system so it is a fresh copy. Reinstalling a fresh copy of macOS High Sierra will not affect your current settings. Applications and settings will remain the same. Completing this process replaces the core files of macOS Mojave in case something wasn’t working right before.

Before you start: Back up your data

  • It is a good idea to perform one full backup before starting with a clean copy of macOS Mojave. You can also back up files and documents using a cloud-based storage system like Dropbox, OneDrive, or the easiest: iCloud.

  • Make sure the computer on which you’re installing a fresh copy of macOS Mojave can be connected to the internet, either via Wi-Fi or Ethernet. This step is important. An Internet connection is needed in order to reinstall the macOS operating system.

  • If you are using a laptop, make sure it is connected to a power source.

How to install a new copy of macOS Mojave in Recovery Mode

Recovery Mode is the special salvation of the Mac that first launched with OS X 10.7 Lion. It creates a temporary boot partition that allows you to access certain things on your computer that you might not be able to if your system froze or crashed. It is the easiest way to install a fresh copy of an operating system.

  1. Connect your Mac to the internet via Wi-Fi or Ethernet
  2. Click on the Apple icon in the upper left corner of your screen.
  3. Select Restart from the drop-down menu.

    Restart your Mac

  4. Hold down Command and R (⌘ + R) at the same time. When you hear the startup chime (or when the screen goes black on newer Macs), keep holding the keys until your computer reboots.
  5. Click on Reinstall a new copy of macOS.
  6. Click Continue.

    Reinstall macOS Sierra

  7. Click Continue again when the installer window appears.
  8. Agree to the software terms and conditions.
  9. Select your hard drive.
  10. Click Install.
  11. Complete the installation process.

    Reinstall macOS Sierra

How to download a fresh copy of macOS Mojave from the Mac App Store

When you install the latest operating system from Recovery Mode, sometimes, your Mac will install an older operating system, like High Sierra or Sierra. Once the older operating system installation is complete, you can then download Mojave directly from the Mac App Store.

Remember, you must have an internet connection in order to download a fresh copy of the Mac operating system.

  1. Click on the Apple icon in the upper left corner of your screen.
  2. Click on App Store…

    Launch the Mac App Store

  3. Click on the Purchased tab in the Mac App Store window.
  4. Select macOS Mojave from the list of purchased apps.
  5. Click Download.

    Download macOS Sierra

  6. Click Continue when asked to confirm that you want to install software that is already on your computer.
  7. Click install after macOS Mojave is finished downloading.
  8. Complete the installation process.

Any questions?

Do you need help reinstalling macOS Mojave on your Mac? Post your questions in the comments and I’ll do my best to help troubleshoot your issue.

Updated September 2018: Updated for the public launch of macOS Mojave.

This post may contain affiliate links. See our disclosure policy for more details.

How to create a bootable installer for macOS Mojave


How to create a bootable installer for macOS Mojave

Make a bootable installer of macOS Mojave so you can have a portable copy to install on multiple devices.

macOS Sierra

If you’re thinking about installing macOS Mojave, the first thing to consider is whether you want to install it directly onto your Mac or create a bootable drive. You can use a bootable drive on a hard drive partition for dual-software installation, to install on multiple Macs in your home, or as a bootable drive if you can’t use the Internet Recovery partition.

Note: These instructions require the use of Terminal. If you don’t feel comfortable making changes to your Mac with Terminal, you can create a bootable disk using the DiskMaker X program.

  • Before you start
  • How to format your external drive for macOS Mojave
  • How to put macOS Mojave onto an external bootable installer drive
  • How to use macOS Mojave with a bootable installer drive

Before you start

Before you get started, make sure you have a thumb drive with at least 15GB of storage, or a spare external hard drive (one you aren’t planning to use for anything else). You’ll also need to download macOS Mojave and ensure that it’s sitting in your Applications folder.

Note: After macOS Mojave has downloaded, it will automatically launch the installer to begin the installation process. Quit the installer when this happens.

And please: Don’t forget to back up your Mac before you do anything.

How to format your external drive for macOS Mojave

You’ll need to start with a clean thumb drive or external hard drive in order to make it a bootable drive.

  1. Plug the thumb drive or cable for your hard drive into the appropriate port on your Mac.
  2. Click on Finder in your Dock to open a Finder window.
  3. Select Applications from the list on the left side of the window.

    Opening Finder on Mac

  4. Scroll down and double-click on Utilities.
  5. Scroll down and double-click on Disk Utility.

    Selecting Disk Utility on Mac

  6. Select your thumb drive or external drive under External.
  7. Click on the Erase tab at the top of the window.

    Erasing a drive on Mac

  8. Note the name of your external hard drive (probably “Untitled”) because you will need it when you create a bootable drive. If you have more than one external drive with the same name, you will need to rename the drive you are using as a bootable installer now.
  9. If your Mac is using AFS+, select Mac OS Extended (Journaled) from the format list. If your Mac is using APFS, select APFS from the list of options.
  10. If Scheme is available, select GUID Partition Map.
  11. Click Erase.
  12. Click Done when the process is complete.
  13. Close the Disk Utility window.

    Confirm erase thumb drive

Your thumb drive or external hard drive is now ready.

How to put macOS Mojave onto your external drive

Important: You will need to use an administrator account on your Mac in order to run the Terminal commands to create a boot drive. You’ll also need to ensure that the macOS Mojave beta is in your Applications folder and you’ll need to know the name of the external drive.

  1. Click on Finder in your Dock to open a Finder window.
  2. Select Applications from the list on the left side of the window.

    Opening Finder on Mac

  3. Scroll down and double-click on Utilities.
  4. Scroll down and double click on Terminal.

    Opening Terminal on Mac

  5. Recall the name of your formatted external drivewhen entering the following text into Terminal. If it is not named “Untitled,” you will need to change the command syntax for the pathname where it says: Volumes/Untitled. The name of the drive can’t have any spaces and it is case sensitive.
  6. Enter the following text into Terminal (Don’t forget to change the name “Untitled” in the text below to the actual name of your external drive. Names are case sensitive and can’t have any spacing.):

    sudo /Applications/Install\ macOS\ Mojave.app/Contents/Resources/createinstallmedia --volume /Volumes/Untitled -- /Applications/Install\ macOS\ Mojave.app

  7. Hit the enter/return key.

  8. Enter your administrator account password. This is the password you use to make changes on your Mac or log in. No text will appear in Terminal when you enter the password.

The process could take a very long time, depending on the drive. When it is done, the Terminal window will report “Done.”

How to install macOS Mojave with a bootable installer drive

Once macOS Mojave is installed on your external drive, you can install it on any Mac with the drive plugged into it. You can use this installer to upgrade your operating system easily on multiple Macs, or to help downgrade if you decide you want to go back to an earlier version of macOS.

If you’re downgrading from macOS Mojave, please check out this guide instead.

How to downgrade from macOS Mojave

If you’re upgrading to macOS Mojave, follow the steps below.

  1. Turn off the Mac you want to install macOS Mojave with the bootable installer drive.
  2. Connect the external drive to your Mac via the USB port.
  3. Turn on your Mac.
  4. Hold down the Option key when it starts up.
  5. Select the external drive with macOS Mojave on it from the list of systems to start up your computer.
  6. Follow the installation process when prompted.

Questions?

Do you have any questions about how to create a bootable drive for the macOS Mojave installer? Let us know in the comments.

Updated September 2018: Updated for the macOS Mojave public release.

This post may contain affiliate links. See our disclosure policy for more details.